Blog posts about Tudor

Tudor’s New Motor

One of the more exciting things to debut at Baselworld was the new in-house movement from Tudor. The brand, which debuted in 1926 as the brainchild of Hans Wilsdorf himself, was conceived as a more modestly priced brand. The intent was to use movements that were generally available. Thus, R&D expenses did not need to […]

Rolex’s Little Brother

Last week we touched on Tudor’s current releases, the Heritage Ranger and the Heritage Chrono Blue. These seemingly homage watches are actually extensions of popular watches of decades gone by. They represent the tip of a resurfacing iceberg. That of Tudor Watches, which in 2013 came back to US shores. Years and decades ago, Tudor […]

Homages, Damned Homages, And Fakes – Part 1

Remember the old aphorism about statistics: “lies, damned lies, and statistics.” It was supposed to put you in mind of the fact that a good statistician can make the numbers say almost anything he wants them to. Implying, of course, that most “facts” based on statistics are lies. I kind of feel that way about […]

Rolex Tudor Heritage Chrono

When Hans Wilsdorf wanted a watch for the everyman, he knew that his flagship brand, Rolex was not the watch line.  So, starting in 1946, Wilsdorf unveiled the Tudor watches complete with a rose flower logo a symbol of the English Tudor dynasty.  The first Tudor watches, the Tudor Oyster and Oyster Prince utilized waterproof […]

Tudor coming to the U.S.: Not your everyday Rolex

Starting in the fall, Tudor watches will be found at select Rolex authorized dealers in the United States. Unlike the early 80’s when Tudor was available in the United States, Tudor of new is an entirely new line taking great pains to distance itself from its parent company, Rolex.  The last time Tudor was available […]

Rolex & Tudor: Tudor coming to the United States

Earlier in February Rolex created a new subsidiary, Tudor Watch USA, LLC with a launch date of summer 2013 under the helm of Russell Kelly.  Tudor watches first opened in 1946, when Rolex founder Hans Wilsdorf wanted a watch that was affordable to all. Wilsdorf named the watch to honor the Tudor period of England, […]